We are all Creatures of Habit

We are all Creatures of Habit

We are all creatures of habit. Our habits are engrained with years, sometimes decades, of repeated behaviours that have worked for us. The conventional wisdom is that it takes three months to change a good habit and six months to change a bad one.  Change is not automatic, but the good news is that we all have the potential to change.

However, unless we constantly reinforce new skills it is unlikely that the change will stick.  There needs to be a way to reinforce the desired change on a regular basis. This can be achieved by running a coaching and training programme over several months, to ensure a sustainable and embedded culture of leadership and autonomy.

We are surrounded by others who are also creatures of habit. When we come back from a workshop, ready to change, others around us are used to the old way of doing things. They naturally resist change and impact our own commitment to change. They will act in ways that reinforce the old habits.

These undesirable influences (established habits), make up the culture of your Practice. Changing that culture begins with the leaders, who must intentionally persevere against this inertia until the change becomes permanent.

We believe that if employee engagement and the principles that lie behind it are more widely understood, if good practice is more widely shared, and if the potential that resides within the practice workforce is more fully unleashed, we will see a step change in workplace performance and in employee engagement, for the considerable benefit of the practice partners and its clients.

Engagement, going to the heart of the workplace relationship between employee and employer, can be a key to unlocking productivity.

Engagement is about creating opportunities for employees to connect with their colleagues, managers and clients. It is also about creating an environment where employees are motivated to want to connect with their work and really care about doing a good job. It is a concept that places flexibility, change and continuous improvement at the heart of what it means to be an employee and an employer in a modern veterinary practice.

How do you get your team to do what you want, when you want, and achieve the outcomes you desire, without asking, begging or getting frustrated when it’s simply not done?

You’ve probably tried many different ways to get your team to work diligently to achieve the outcomes you require, and yet your team doesn’t work together consistently, and this frustrates you and your managers. There is a way to effectively get your team to consistently add value to every part of your business and proactively work together to provide amazing client and patient care, whilst freeing up your time to give you the freedom to choose if and when you want to work, whether it be in the business or on the business.

Of course you will need to release control to your leadership team at some stage, and this you will do once you have a structured and trusted system of effective delegation.

To achieve this freedom there are certain systems and frameworks that need to be put in place:

  • Develop a culture of accountability and improvement.
  • The team have a clear vision of what the business can be and understand the steps to get there.
  • The team measure their own progress regarding reaching this vision.
  • Each team member clearly understands their role and how they can contribute to the success of the business via effective feedback and feedforward systems.
  • Leaders and Line Managers build sustainable systems to ensure ongoing performance.

 

For more information, please contact us.

By Debbie Robinson

No Comments

Post A Comment